Registered Dietitians

Victoria Middleton

Victoria Middleton

RD
Registered Dietitian
New York City, NY
Yumna Khan

Yumna Khan

RD
Registered Dietitian
Burlington, ON
Margarita deGraaf

Margarita deGraaf

RD
Registered Dietitian
Burlington, ON
Alexis Williams

Alexis Williams

RD
Registered Dietitian
Burlington, ON
Anita Gleeson

Anita Gleeson

RD., CDE.
Registered Dietitian
Oakville, ON
Mrs. Jyotika Desai

Mrs. Jyotika Desai

MSc, RD
Registered Dietitian
Oakville, ON
Courtney Bloch

Courtney Bloch

RD
Registered Dietitian
Toronto, ON
Ms. Jaclyn Pritchard

Ms. Jaclyn Pritchard

Jaclyn Pritchard, RD Weight and Lifestyle Management Cleveland Clinic Canada.
Registered Dietitian
Toronto, ON
Stefanie Senior

Stefanie Senior

BSc.
Registered Dietitian
Toronto, ON
Fedaa Boqaileh

Fedaa Boqaileh

MSc, RD, CDE
Registered Dietitian
Toronto, ON
Neda Kiani

Neda Kiani

Registered Dietitian
Toronto, ON
Amardeep Riar

Amardeep Riar

RD
Registered Dietitian
Toronto, ON
Jenny Accettura

Jenny Accettura

Registered Dietitian
Toronto, ON
Saima Murtaza-Vahed

Saima Murtaza-Vahed

RD
Registered Dietitian
Toronto, ON
Justine Chan

Justine Chan

RD
Registered Dietitian
Toronto, ON
Samantha Cooper

Samantha Cooper

MHSc, RD
Registered Dietitian
Toronto, ON
Tracy Morris

Tracy Morris

Registered Dietitian
Toronto, ON
Mahsa Esmaeili

Mahsa Esmaeili

RD
Registered Dietitian
Toronto, ON
Elke Sengmueller

Elke Sengmueller

RD
Registered Dietitian
Toronto, ON
Emilie Trottier

Emilie Trottier

RD
Registered Dietitian
Toronto, ON
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local registered dietitian  has completed education and training to specialize in a wide variety of fields, including sport nutrition, gerontological nutrition, pediatric nutrition and renal nutrition. A local Registered Dietitian or she may work in private practice, in a nursing home, school, hospital or food service facility.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in North America. Heart disease refers to many conditions that affect the heart, including coronary artery disease, heart valve disease, heart attack, heart rhythm problems (arrhythmias) and more.

Lifestyle Habits & Heart Disease

While there are some heart disease risk factors you can’t control, there are some you can, including diet and lifestyle. Up to 80% of premature heart disease and stroke can be prevented through your lifestyle habits. Eating a well-balanced diet can lower your cholesterol and blood pressure and help you lose weight. A diet low in saturated fat and high in fibre and plant food can reduce your risk of developing heart disease by:

• Improving your cholesterol and blood pressure levels 
• Controlling your blood sugar 
• Helping you maintain a healthy body weight 

If you have congestive heart failure, fluid retention is one of the biggest issues you face. You should aim to eat less than 2,000 milligrams of sodium daily - the average North American diet has about four to five thousand milligrams. Just as a diabetic would test their blood sugars every day to see how much insulin they need to take, a person with heart failure should be doing a daily weight check to monitor for fluid retention. Weigh yourself before breakfast and consult with your healthcare provider if you gain five pounds in a week or four pounds in two or three days.

Heart-Healthy Diet Tips

Here are some ways to ensure you’re eating a heart-healthy diet:

• Aim for 7-10 servings of fruits and vegetables. Fruits and vegetables are rich in vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and fibre.
• Avoid highly-processed foods such as fast food, deli meats and hot dogs. During processing vitamins, fibre and minerals are often removed while sugar or salt is added. 
​​​​• Incorporate more whole grain foods into your diet, such as brown rice, quinoa and whole grain bread. They’re rich in fibre, B vitamins and protein.
• Look for foods that contain unsaturated fat rather than saturated fat. Lower your trans fatty acid intake by avoiding foods with hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oils, shortening and margarine. 
• Make sure you’re getting enough protein to maintain heathy bones and muscles. Look for beans, fish, tofu and lean meat. 
• Stop drinking empty calories, which are found in fruit juices, energy drinks and soft drinks. They offer no nutritional value and can lead to weight gain. Choose water more often.

There are so many steps you can take towards a healthier heart, and diet is a big one. While it may seem daunting to change your eating habits, your heart will thank you!

Talk to your family physician if you'd like more information on nutrition contact your local registered dietician.

Visit HealthChoicesFirst.com for more videos and resources on family health.

Print this Action Plan and check off items that you want to discuss with your healthcare provider

  • Up to 80% of premature heart disease and stroke can be prevented through your lifestyle habits.

  • A diet low in saturated fat and high in fibre and plant food can reduce your risk of developing heart disease by improving your cholesterol and blood pressure levels, controlling your blood sugar and helping you maintain a healthy body weight.

  • Aim for 7-10 servings of fruits and vegetables per day. Fruits and vegetables are rich in vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and fibre.

  • ongestive heart failure, fluid retention is one of the biggest issues you face. You should aim to eat less than 2,000 milligrams of sodium daily.

  • Adherence:

Adhering to your medications, prescribed exercises or lifestyle changes (such as dietary changes, smoking cessation, reduced alcohol consumption, etc.) is essential to improving health outcomes successfully. Compliance to any prescribed treatment is the number one thing you can do to ensure positive changes and optimal treatment outcomes.

  A local Registered Dietitian In treating patients a  registered dietitian can also educate them on meal planning, lowering cholesterol, nutritional requirements for people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes and anorexia and bulimia recovery. In regards to Arthritus a Registered Dietician can help with anti inflamitorty foods and celiac disease.

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