How To Avoid Hypoglycemia in Type 1 and 2 Diabetes

Dr. Jean-Francois Yale, MD, CSPQ, FRCPC, Endocrinologist, discusses how to avoid Hypoglycemia in Type 1 & 2 Diabetes.

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Dr. Jean-Francois Yale, MD, CSPQ, FRCPC, Endocrinologist, discusses how to avoid Hypoglycemia in Type 1 & 2 Diabetes.
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Dr. Jean-Francois Yale, MD, CSPQ, FRCPC, Endocrinologist, discusses how to avoid Hypoglycemia in Type 1 & 2 Diabetes.

Presenter: Dr. Jean-François Yale, Endocrinologist, Montreal, QC

Local Practitioners: Endocrinologist

97-100 People got two or more of these video questions wrong... ( 144 participated.)

Understanding How To Prevent Hypoglycemia

Questions
 
True
False
1

Exercising more than usual isn't a cause of hypoglycemia.

Explanation:

You may develop hypoglycemia from taking too much diabetes medication or insulin, exercising more than usual or skipping a meal. You can determine if you have low blood sugar by using a blood glucose meter.

2

Hunger is an early symptom of hypoglycemia.

Explanation:

Early symptoms of diabetic hypoglycemia include: dizziness, hunger, headache, sweating and anxiety.

3

Blurry vision is a symptom of more severe hypoglycemia.

Explanation:

If left untreated, diabetic hypoglycemia can lead to seizures and loss of consciousness. Watch for more severe symptoms such as muscle weakness, jerky movements, blurry vision, slurred speech and confusion.

4

Short-term hypoglycemia treatment involves eating sodium-rich foods such as potato chips.

Explanation:

Short-term hypoglycemia treatment involves drinking fruit juice or soda, eating hard candy or taking glucose tablets to raise your blood sugar to a normal range.

5

Not skipping meals is a way to prevent diabetic hypoglycemia.

Explanation:

To prevent diabetic hypoglycemia don't skip meals, monitor your blood sugar, take your insulin and diabetes medication as prescribed and record your low glucose reactions to help identify patterns.

6

Hypoglycemia is not a barrier to achieving good glycemic control.

Explanation:

Having a hypoglycemic event has not been shown to affect the way a patient subsequently manages their diabetes

This content is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare professional with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

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