MCL (Medial Collateral Ligament) knee injuries.

Dr. Jordan Leith, MD, MHSc, FRCPC, Orthopedic Surgeon, discusses MCL (Medial Collateral Ligament) knee injuries.

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Dr. Jordan Leith, MD, MHSc, FRCPC, Orthopedic Surgeon, discusses MCL (Medial Collateral Ligament) knee injuries.
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Featuring Dr. Jordan Leith, MD, MHSc, FRCS, Orthopedic Surgeon

Presenter: Dr. Jordan Leith, Orthopaedic Surgeon, Vancouver, BC

Local Practitioners: Orthopaedic Surgeon

97-100 People got two or more of these video questions wrong... ( 10 participated.)

Quiz: Do You Understand MCL (Medial Collateral Ligament) Knee Surgery?

Questions
 
True
False
1

Medial collateral ligament sprains range in degrees of severity from 1 to 5.

Explanation:

Medial collateral ligament sprains range in degrees of severity from 1 to 3, with 3 being the worst (a complete tear of the ligament). The majority of MCL injuries are grade 1 and 2, and are generally treated non-surgically.

2

These injuries are common in sports such as downhill skiing and hockey, as are ACL tears.

Explanation:

These injuries are common is sports such as downhill skiing and hockey, as are ACL tears. It occurs when there is a valgus load to the knee, which is when the force is coming from the outside and the ligament on the inside gets stretched or twisted.

3

Symptoms of a medial collateral ligament sprain include pain along the medial side of your knee, swelling and stiffness.

Explanation:

Symptoms of a medial collateral ligament sprain include pain along the medial side of your knee, swelling and stiffness. You should see your family doctor if these symptoms are more significant.

4

The best initial treatment for an MCL injury is usually surgery.

Explanation:

The best initial treatment is with the RICE protocol (rest, ice, compression and elevation) and anti-inflammatories. On average, it takes six weeks for an MCL injury to heal.

5

MCL reconstruction surgery is done arthroscopically.

Explanation:

MCL reconstruction surgery is rarely required, but if it is it’s typically done through a small incision on the inside of the knee. It cannot be done arthroscopically, as the medial collateral ligament is not inside the knee joint.

This content is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare professional with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

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