Understanding carpal tunnel syndrome and it's treatments

Dr. Herb Von Schroeder, MD, FRCSC, Orthopaedic Surgeon, talks about carpal tunnel syndrome and the various treatment options available to patients.

Loading the player...

Dr. Herb Von Schroeder, MD, FRCSC, Orthopaedic Surgeon, talks about carpal tunnel syndrome and the various treatment options available to patients.
224 Views
Share
Video transcript

Dr. Herb Von Schroeder, MD, FRCSC, Orthopaedic Surgeon Title: Understanding carpal tunnel syndrome and it's treatments

Duration: 3:26

Presenter: Dr. Herb Von Schroeder, Orthopaedic Surgeon, Toronto, ON

Local Practitioners: Orthopaedic Surgeon

97-100 People got two or more of these video questions wrong... ( 1 participated.)

Carpel Tunnel Syndrome

Questions
True
False
0

When diagnosing carpel tunnel syndrome, once your doctor has made a diagnosis, an added diagnostic tool is to get a nerve conduction study done.

Explanation:

When you start developing symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome, and your diagnosis has been confirmed by your family physician, sometimes an added diagnosis is getting something called a nerve conduction study, where you’re sent to a neurologist to test the level of slowing of that nerve.

1

A nerve conduction test helps diagnose the amount of compression the nerve has, which is directly related to the amount of pain a person is feeling.

Explanation:

A conduction test will often come back positive, and it will give you some idea of the degree of compression; not that that’s related, necessarily, to your symptoms, but it does help confirm the diagnosis.

2

When first diagnosed, many physicians will recommend wearing a brace on the wrist at night in order to hold the wrist straight.

Explanation:

Early in the disease, in the entity, when you start having numbness in your hands, most physicians will recommend bracing at nighttime. It will keep your wrist in a straighter position.

3

Moving the joints in extreme flexion is not advised while doing daily activities, sports or hobbies.

Explanation:

They may ask you to avoid positions of extreme extension or flexion of your wrist joint during the daytime at work, or at hobbies or sports that you do.

4

Using anti-inflammatories or cortisone injections is of little help to carpel tunnel.

Explanation:

Your physician may put you on some anti-inflammatories to settle some of your symptoms, and some doctors will actually inject cortisone into your carpal canal that may help you temporarily.

5

Typically, carpel tunnel is a short term problem and symptoms will resolve on their own.

Explanation:

The problem is, by and large, a progressive problem. So you may have mild symptoms for one day, and worse another, and month-to-month it may change. But the natural course of this is over years it will usually get worse.

This content is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare professional with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

QA Chat