Cataract Repair with Intraocular Lens Replacement

Dr. Greg Moloney, MBBS, BSC MED, MMED, FRCSC, Ophthalmologist, explains what cataracts are and how they are corrected with intraocular lens surgery (IOL).

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Dr. Greg Moloney, MBBS, BSC MED, MMED, FRCSC, Ophthalmologist, explains what cataracts are and how they are corrected with intraocular lens surgery (IOL).
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Dr. Greg Moloney, MBBS, BSC MED, MMED, FRCSC, Ophthalmologist

Cataract repairs with Intraocular Lens replacement

Our eye works a lot like a camera. In order for us to see clearly, the light has to be focused by a lens. We are all born with a lens inside our eye that does this job for us and in early life it is crystal clear. As we age, this lens can become cloudy and begin to block light or create blur. We call this change in the lens a “cataract”.

If we live long enough, we will all develop a cataract and surgery will eventually be required. The idea of having eye surgery is usually confronting. But cataract surgery has now become one of the most commonly performed procedures worldwide with a very high degree of safety. The procedure is typically a fast, day surgery. Through a micro incision, the cataract is broken down and removed from the eye. In its place a new intraocular lens or “IOL” is inserted to do the job of focusing light. There are many types of lens designs available and not all types are suitable for all patients. Some may correct astigmatism if you have this, some may offer focus over multiple distances to reduce the need for reading glasses. The choice of the right IOL for each patient is a usually a discussion between patient and doctor.

Typically your vision will be somewhat blurry the day of the procedure, with return of clear vision over days or weeks. Complications of cataract surgery are fortunately very rare. Serious complications like infection or retinal detachment will occur in less than 1% of patients. Both are treatable if caught early and this is why keeping post operative appointments is important. Less serious complications such as swelling, a need to go back to surgery for minor adjustment or replacement of a lens, bothersome light or shadow effects can occur, but are manageable problems with existing solutions.

Satisfaction rates after cataract surgery are high. It is usually a procedure that makes a positive change to your vision and your life. If you would like more information about cataracts, please don’t hesitate to reach out to your local optician or ophthalmologist.

If you would like more information about laser refractive procedures, please don’t hesitate to reach out to your local optician or ophthalmologist.

Presenter: Dr. Greg Moloney, Ophthalmologist, Vancouver, BC

Local Practitioners: Ophthalmologist

Cataracts ( 26 engaged.)

Please email or save the PDF for discussion with your Healthcare provider at your next visit.

Cataracts ( 26 engaged.)

Please email or save the PDF for discussion with your Healthcare provider at your next visit.

97-100 People got two or more of these video questions wrong... ( 270 participated.)

Quiz: Do You Understand Cataracts?

Questions
 
True
False
1

Cataracts always develop in both eyes at once.

Explanation:

Cataracts can affect both eyes or just one, and some patients experience mild symptoms, while others can barely see any shapes or movements.

2

Decreased night vision can be a symptom of cataracts.

Explanation:

Cataract symptoms include blurry vision, haloes, sensitivity to bright lights, decreased night vision, frequent changes in eyeglass prescriptions, and faded colours.

3

Cataracts don't develop as a result of diseases such as diabetes.

Explanation:

Cataracts can be caused by trauma, diseases such as diabetes or medications such as steroids.

4

An outpatient surgical procedure is the treatment for cataracts.

Explanation:

If you’re diagnosed with a cataract, your ophthalmologist will recommend an outpatient surgical procedure.

5

There are two types of intraocular lenses.

Explanation:

There are two types of IOLs: monovision (fixed-focus for a preset distance) or multifocal (focused vision at various distances).

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This content is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare professional with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

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